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Tuesday, September 22, 2015

white flowers

Peak wildflower bloom is coming... Soon every patch of weeds is going to be ablaze of colour...
It seems that the lead up is offering a high percentage of whites....

Some sites refer to this plant as Clinopodium georgianum, others use Clinopodium carolinianum...
Which ever you want to call it, this sand mint... Georgia savory... seems like it has a ton of potential.

dalea pinnata is a neat plant that I want to propagate so bad that I can taste it... Unfortunately, the seeds do not come up for me... I even tried shaking them up in a can of sand when someone suggested the seeds might need stratifying...
Nor have I been successful in transplanting dalea.... for a short lived perennial... this neat plant seems to live on the verge of disappearing...

Not sure where this rain lily came from...

 Hog peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata)... Seems to grow wild over much of Macon... And seems to have taken to the dry sand well enough too... of course, the weather this year has been the best that I can remember in the 20+ years that I've been in the area...


eupatorium serotinum... this plant has the sweetest smelling bloom!

Verbesina  virginica 

 Here's another tall eupatorium, flowers look and smell the same as the E. serotinum, but look at the leaf! Earlier in the year... it looks like mugwort!
If I don't find the name with google real soon... Ima post it to 'all things plants' and let them id...
Edit: The best guess so far seems to be (Eupatorium ×pinnatifidum)


Eupatorium hyssopifolium

Here's another one that's throwing me off... Possibly Eupatorium glaucescens or eupatorium mohrii... and truth to tell... I may have both...

Ok... this one is easy... Sugar snap peas from the autumn garden...

Hardy cyclamen... not sure why they're white... 

Flowering ginger... Really a poor choice for the sandhills... I planted the ginger under the overhang from the house... gets all the rain from the roof... and still... barely blooms!

pseudognaphalium obtusifolium Supposed to be host plant for the American Lady butterfly... Never actually see caterpillars... but have plenty of them flying in the garden... so... a keeper...

Liatris elegans

Moonflower (ipomoea alba)

 

1 Comments:

Blogger Jean Campbell said...

Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium is about a foot high in the meadows. At the NE corner of my greenhouse, it's 4 feet tall. The American Painted Lady I saw yesterday was not visiting it; instead was 'nectaring' on what the dog deposited at the edge of a flower bed.

September 22, 2015 at 3:13 PM  

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